Based in Boston, Massachusetts, Claudia is a science journalist and editor. Her work focuses on marine science, the environment, and wildlife, particularly regarding how humans interact with the world around them.

These May Be the Deepest Traces of Life on Earth

These May Be the Deepest Traces of Life on Earth

 VIEW IMAGES

Samples of serpentine from an underwater mud volcano include organic material that seems to be waste from microbes living deep beneath the surface.

 
PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OLIVER PLÜMPER, UTRECHT UNIVERSITY

By Claudia Geib

On Earth circa four billion years ago, life was hard. Frequent asteroid strikes turned parts of the planet into molten rock. Food and livable spaces were few and far between. What was a microbe to do to survive?

Some very early life could have made it by staying deep—living as far as six miles below the seafloor.

That’s the implication from a new study that found signs of microbes alive today below the deepest place on Earth, the vast underwater canyon called the Mariana Trench.

Read more over at National Geographic. 

How Animals Develop Regional Accents

How Animals Develop Regional Accents

The Accidental Slaughter of Millions of Seahorses

The Accidental Slaughter of Millions of Seahorses